Daley B

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by Jon Blake. Illustrated by Axel Scheffter. Picture Book. 32 pages. Grades K-3.
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Review

This book is currently out of print, but still widely available through libraries and used.

Daley B. doesn't know what he is, what he should eat, where he should live or why he has such big feet. He lives in a tree because that's where the squirrels live and he eats acorns and wonders about his big feet. When the other rabbits warn that Jazzy D. is coming, Daley B. stays unperturbed in his tree, eating acorns. When Jazzy D. finds no rabbits in their burrows, the weasel comes to Daley B. who greets her cheerfully. Jazzy D. is intent on eating Daley B. but the rabbit is full of questions for her: where does she live? what does she eat? He is astounded when she attacks and, without thinking kicks out with his big feet, sending Jazzy D. back to where she came from.

This is a funny story with all sorts of possible leads to other books and activities. The scene with Daley B. and Jazzy D. in the tree is reminiscent of the one in "Little Red Riding Hood" in which the wolf lies in Granny's bed and Red Riding Hood questions its eyes and teeth. There are many books in which a character seeks to know what or who he is and finding and discussing some of them could be the next step. Since Daley B doesn’t know where to live and what to eat, we can get into habitats and food chains from this patterned text.


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